Tag Archives: Tom Vincent

BLUES IN AMERICA, TOM VINCENT

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CD REVIEW 

3.5 stars *

Blues in America: Tom Vincent piano, Branford Marsalis soprano and tenor sax, Leigh Barker & Matt Clohesy double bass, Alf Jackson drums

I have not reviewed albums for a long time, for a few reasons, but that may change. Let’s see how this turns out.

If I were a musician it’s fair bet that I’d be anxious about not being inventive enough and being caught out repeating phrases that I’d used in previous solos — worried that I may not be keeping the improvisations fresh and always different. That kind of concern is in the back of my mind whenever I write reviews of albums or live performances — my version of the goalkeeper’s fear of the penalty kick is the fear that I’ll keep repeating words and phrases, thereby revealing an inability to do more than trot out a standard set of reactions to the music. With that goes a worry about my lack of musical training or knowledge, and my limited knowledge of the American songbook and the deeply embedded lore of jazz.

When I read, for instance, Paul Grabowsky‘s words about music and musicians, I’m inclined to think that if the people who play so well and compose music so well can write about it so eloquently, why not leave it to them.

Another reason for avoiding CD reviews is that I slipped so far behind in delivering them that it became an obligation not met and therefore the joy of listening slipped away a little. Why was it hard to just pop out a review? Well, partly for the reasons expressed above, but also because music is, I believe, not easy to write about. I have long yearned for a feed from the brain to the screen (or paper) so that my experience can be delivered directly to the reader, without interference. In that way, when I’m in the moment listening at a live gig or to an album via headphones, the intensity of that experience could be delivered undiluted. It would still, of course, be one person’s experience, as is any reviewer’s.

So, with that palaver out of the way, what can I say about Tom Vincent‘s Blues in America? First, the mechanics. Blues in America was recorded in October 2015 at Sound Pure studio in Durham, North Carolina and at Big Orange Sheep in Brooklyn, New York City.  Vincent is joined on the Durham tracks — one, three and five — by Branford Marsalis on soprano and tenor saxophones and by Leigh Barker on double bass, and on the Brooklyn tracks —two and four — by Matt Clohesy, who has lived in New York for many years, on double bass. Hobart drummer Alf Jackson plays on all tracks.

The title track is a Tom Vincent original. The others are composer Donald Kahn’s classic A Beautiful Friendship, the Bernie, Pinkard & Casey standard Sweet Georgia Brown, Russian-born composer/songwriter Vernon Duke’s Autumn in New York and Jimmy Hanley’s hit (Back Home Again in) Indiana.

When Vincent launched his Pozible campaign to fund Blues in America, he said, “This is going to be a swingin’ album”. He’s not wrong. Swing and propulsion are evident throughout, and that’s not so common in a lot of improvised music these days. Much of the drive comes from Barker and Clohesy, of course, but the rhythmic thrust shown in Sweet Georgia Brown, along with varied dynamics and nice chordal contrasts, provides a great paradigm of a rhythm section in top form. This Georgia is one toe-tappin’ gal.

The opening A Beautiful Friendship — featuring wandering, exploratory and at times embroidered piano soloing followed by tenor musings and some interplay from Marsalis — is well laid back, yet ends with a heightened sense of swing.

Vincent’s original Blues in America is pretty jaunty for a blues and much faster, with lots of rapid and intricate repartee between piano and soprano sax, Marsalis being more agile than the nation Malcolm Turnbull once dreamed about. The exchanges make this a favourite for me.

Much slower is the Autumn in New York ballad and the mood change conjures images of leaves drifting down from the trees in Central Park, with maybe a sprinkling or two of drops after a shower. Put your feet up for this and let the thoughts drift past.

Indiana is bright and jaunty, Barker taking us on a fast walk as Vincent treats us to expansive vistas with gentle swing and Marsalis floats out easy tenor notes over the brush work of Jackson. The ending is tight and punchy, with a final “parp” from Marsalis.

Tom Vincent’s Blues in America is further confirmation — as if we needed it — that Australian jazz musicians can seamlessly team with those in the New York scene and produce a fine result. It also provides an excellent opportunity to demonstrate just how good Vincent is at the keyboard, delivering fluidity and swing in a way that draws on what I think of as older traditions or roots of jazz.

ROGER MITCHELL

* Stars? I’m not so keen on the star ratings, mainly because they can be used so differently by reviewers. In the tradition I was taught by Kenny Weir at the Sunday Herald Sun, where 4.5 or 5 stars were reserved for albums that had survived the test of time and had probably been re-released, I’d say this is a 3.5 plus, which is a definite recommendation to buy. If you want to, go to Tom Vincent’s website.

 

SWINGIN’ WITH BRANFORD

Tom Vincent

Tom Vincent                                      Image supplied

POZIBLE CAMPAIGN

Tom Vincent is a jazz pianist, arranger and composer from Hobart, Tasmania, who performs worldwide and over the years has been based in Sydney, London, New York, Melbourne and Amsterdam. He continues to travel frequently to record and to perform in concert at jazz festivals and special events.

As well as touring internationally and nationally, Tom has produced seven CDs as bandleader.

Right now he has project live on Pozible to raise $2600 for his American Album, recorded in October last year — 2015 — in North Carolina with Branford Marsalis, and in New York City with Alf Jackson and Matt Clohesy. Tom says this is going to be “a swingin’ album”.

If you would like to pledge $25 for a CD, check out this link. And here’s an extract of Tom Vincent’s explanatory notes for the campaign:

“In 2010 I met Branford Marsalis when his Quartet was touring Australia. Our Trio was the support act. We got to hang and play. On the last gig of the tour at the Sydney Opera House Branford got us back on stage to play an encore with him. We were very fortunate. I have been listening to Branford since my teens. He is a master musician, gentleman, and very cool.

“My Dad said that if I ever get the opportunity to record with Branford I should do it. Years later I lined it up and in October 2015 we went over and spent a day in a recording studio in Durham, North Carolina, Branford and Joey Calderazzo’s home town. While we were in Durham Joey took me to his place and we spent a day at the piano. It was probably the best piano lesson I’ve ever had.

“Robert Hunter was the sound engineer for the session in Durham. He has been Branford’s sound engineer since Branford’s days of working with Sting, which is about twenty years. He is incredible. Sound engineering is a mysterious art. I don’t know how they do it. There are a handful of exceptional sound engineers out there who can record, mix and master with such brilliance.

“After Durham we went to New York City. Alf Jackson, my drummer from Hobart and I, spent a day in the recording studio with double bassist Matt Clohesy. Matt is on my first two CDs and was on the first Tom Vincent Trio Australian Tour in 2000. Matt has carved himself out a very successful career in New York and internationally over the last 15 years. A couple of tracks from this session in Brooklyn will be on the CD.

“This is going to be a swingin’ album! My best yet. Help us make the CD and be the first to hear it and own it. Can’t wait! Thanks in reverse. Also … we will throw a party for the person who pledges the most 😀
Pledge now!

How the funds will be used:

Mixing and Mastering of the tracks for the album: $1,250
Original hand printed artwork: $800
Design and pre-press production for CD: $620
Mechanical Royalties (the album is mostly jazz standards.
royalties go to people who own the copyrights): $595
Glass master: $60
Manufacturing of CDs: $2,050+
Shipping and postage costs: aprox $520+
Miscellaneous including Pozible, credit card, Paypal etc: aprox $305+

Roger Mitchell

NOT TO MENTION …

Reason 12

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12. MANY OTHER FANTASTIC PERFORMERS

Ausjazz blog has not exhausted the myriad reasons why you should not miss the opportunity to be at all or part of Wangaratta Jazz and Blues Festival this year, but a dozen is clearly not enough, so I’ve grouped a few who absolutely deserve a mention.

Friday, November 2 at 10pm, WPAC Theatre: Paul Grabowsky and Bernie McGann will perform jazz standards and original compositions in a quartet with bassist Jonathan Zwartz and on drums 2011 National Jazz Awards winner Tim Firth.

Friday, November 2 at 9:45pm, WPAC Memorial Hall: Marc Hannaford with his trio with talented young bassist Sam Pankhust and drummer James McLean, as heard on Marc’s CD Sarcophile.

Saturday, November 3 at 4:30pm, WPAC Memorial Hall: Scott Tinkler Quartet with Marc Hannaford (piano), Sam Pankhurst (bass) and Simon Barker (drums)

Saturday. November 3 at 4pm, Holy Trinity Cathedral: Tim Stevens will perform solo on piano.

Saturday, November 3 at noon Holy Trinity Cathedral: Doug De Vries with bassist Frank Di Sario and drummer/percussionist Alastair Kerr will be playing Brazilian music.

Sunday, November 4 at 12:30pm WPAC Memorial Hall: Tim Stevens will also play in his trio with Ben Robertson on bass and Dave Beck on drums.

Saturday, November 3 at 2:30pm WPAC Memorial Hall: Allan Browne will lead his trio with Marc Hannaford and Sam Anning.

Sunday, November 4 at 6pm, St Patrick’s Hall
: Bob Barnard and Warwick Alder on trumpets.

Saturday, November 3 at 8pm, St Patrick’s Hall
: Hobart pianist Tom Vincent playing Wangaratta for the first time, joined by Sam Anning (bass) and Danny Fischer (drums).

Sunday, November 4 at 8pm, St Patrick’s Hall: Eminent pianist Tony Gould will feature in a quartet with Rob Burke on saxophone, Nick Haywood on bass and Tony Floyd on drums, as well as in the trio (Sunday, November 4 at 2pm, Holy Trinity Cathedral) he co-leads with Imogen Manins on cello and Gianni Marinucci on flugelhorn and trumpet.

Saturday, November 3 at 12:30pm, WPAC Memorial Hall: Sydney bassist/composer Hannah James, a graduate from the ANU School of Music in Canberra, will play in a trio with two members of her quintet, Casey Golden on piano and Ed Rodrigues on drums. Phil Slater on trumpet will be a guest soloist.

Monday, November 5, 1pm, WPAC: Youth jazz showcase concert added to the program on Monday afternoon. It’s separately ticketed, but covered by a festival pass. Generations in Jazz Academy Big Band from Mt Gambier directed by Graeme Lyall; the Monash University Big Band directed by Jordan Murray; and the National Youth Jazz Academy band, with young students aged 18 to 19, based in Wangaratta. This includes a trumpet player aged 13 who is precociously talented.

Hope to see some blog readers at Wangaratta.

ROGER MITCHELL