Tag Archives: Peter Knight

SCOTT TINKLER IS THE MOTHER OF INVENTION

Hard core: Scott Tinkler

Hard core: Scott Tinkler

PREVIEW: Hard Core on the Fly, Australian Art Orchestra,
7, 14, 21 and 28 August at Bennetts Lane Jazz Club, 8.30pm

Hecklers can gird their loins and other lovers of improvised music can get ready to strap themselves in and take the ride of their lives.

Tonight (7 August 2014) at 8.30pm at Bennetts Lane Jazz Club in Melbourne, and for the following three Thursdays, curator Scott Tinkler and the Australian Art Orchestra will unleash utterly unrehearsed music, created on the fly. Of course no one’s suggesting that anyone should heckle in the style of the curator, but anyone who decides to be there needs to hang on to their hat.

Hard Core on the Fly features  some of Australia’s most exciting musicians and, for two concerts only, special guest George Garzone (USA) will join the line-up.

Each week a different combination of players will feature. They will meet, sometimes for the first time, one hour directly before the gig.

George Garzone

George Garzone

Garzone will play in Melbourne on 21 August and also in Perth on 28 August during this third series of Hard Core on the Fly. 

According to series curator Scott Tinkler these performances are intended to “broaden the musician base of the AAO and introduce new energy and ideas into the improvising culture of AAO members, creating new musical relationships and recognising established ones”.

“Each of the established artists involved have very strong ideas about improvisation and varied, but well practised approaches. Each week will see some well established musical relationships with the added excitement of brand new ones lurking,” he said in a statement to eager media representatives.

 “It is my hope that in the course of collaboration through performance that every one involved is challenged to find ways to relate and communicate with the other artists. My ultimate hope is that each week the joy of exploring music through improvisation is experienced by the artists. Audiences in past years have delighted in witnessing and sharing this experience and we look forward to welcoming them again.”

As well as the gigs, for the first time the AAO will conduct private workshops on improvisation at WAAPA (Perth), the Western Australian Youth Jazz Orchestra (Perth), and Southern Cross University (Lismore). Facilitators include  Tinkler, Stephen Magnusson, James Greening, Gian Slater and Carl Dewhurst.

Peter Knight

Peter Knight fires up during the 2014 MIJF

The line-ups for each Bennetts Lane concert are as follows:

7 August

Peter Knight trumpet, electronics, Adrian Sherriff trombone, Adam King drums, Brett Thompson guitar, Matthias Schack-Arnott percussion, James Macaulay trombone

Erkki Veltheim

Erkki Veltheim

14 August

Scott Tinkler trumpet, Anthony Burr clarinet, Erkki Veltheim violin, Ren Walters guitar, Dave Beck drums, Jenny Barnes vocals

Ren Walters

Ren Walters

21 August

George Garzone (USA) saxophone, Simon Barker drums, Scott Tinkler trumpet, Samuel Pankhurst bass, Stephen Magnusson guitar, Scott McConnachie saxophone

Geoff Hughes

Geoff Hughes

28 August

Geoff Hughes guitar, Eugene Ball trumpet, Harry Shaw-Reynolds drums, Joseph O’Connor piano, Marty Holoubek bass, James Macaulay trombone

ROGER MITCHELL

EVENT DETAILS:

Dates: Thursday 7, 14, 21 and 28 August

Times: Doors open 8:30pm at each concert

Venue: Bennetts Lane Jazz Club, Melbourne

Cost: $20 / $15 + booking fee for each concert

Bookings: www.bennettslane.com

Website: www.aao.com.au

BREAKING NEW GROUND OUT WEST

Satsuki Odamura

Satsuki Odamura plays koto with Way Out West

PICTORIAL UPDATE:

Way Out West plays Footscray Community Arts Centre, 7.30pm Tuesday 3 June for the Melbourne International Jazz Festival

It was a significant milestone last night when Peter Knight‘s ensemble Way Out West played in Footscray at the venue in which the band — with a slightly different line-up — played its first gig 14 years ago. It was also significant in that the MIJF was venturing out west for the first time this year.

Yay! A crowded house for jazz out west.

Yay! A crowded house for jazz out west.

It was a relief to see that the seats in the FCAC Performance Space were filling quickly. Westies are waking up to the delights of live music.

Band shows its colours: instruments await Way Out West players.

Band shows its colours: instruments await Way Out West players.

I rarely post images in colour (more of that in a moment), but in this case the lighting complemented the array of instruments assembled on stage for Way Out West musicians, who must need a large truck to carry their gear. There are two versions of the Japanese koto for Satsuki Odamura and a bewildering array of drums and percussion devices played by Ray Pereira — he seems to add an instrument every year.

In the black: Raj Jayaweera on drums and Paul Williamson on tenor sax.

In the red: what unkind lighting can do to Raj Jayaweera on drums and Paul Williamson on tenor sax.

Waiting in the dark on the side with the young photographers clad in light blue MIJF T-shirts before the performance, I wondered what the lighting would be like. Let’s face it, lighting is only of concern to photographers and not punters, but that does not mean it is unimportant. In most venues it is passable at best. Often one or two members of a band are in bright light, the others all in darkness. The wonderful red spots are the bane of music photographers’ lives.

When the lights came up, and we had two songs in which to take our shots (a rule seemingly ignored by the T-shirted snappers), I groaned inwardly. Again, I understand that audiences do not care about lighting provided the music is good, but we take photographs to help promote the bands and the music, and to attract more people to live music. Let’s just say that the image above shows what happens in red light. The image below shows why many photographers turn shots into black and white in a bid to resurrect what they can.

In the black: Raj Jayaweera on drums and Paul Williamson on tenor sax.

In the black: Raj Jayaweera on drums and Paul Williamson on tenor sax.

While on about photography at gigs and festivals, controls are vital to protect the listening experience of patrons and in order not to drive musicians mad. But the rule of first two songs only has its problems, because in jazz that could be very short or very long. And the imposed limit means that the clicking is going to go on regardless of whether the first two songs are quiet or not, because that’s the only window of opportunity. Really it would be better if photographers respected the music and did not shoot at all in quiet passages. Unless, of course, they can afford completely silent cameras. I’m still searching for an affordable camera that is completely silent and yet copes with low light.

Satsuki Odamura

Satsuki Odamura

Way Out West played four new compositions — Latest and Breaking, The Birds, Nine Years Later (dedicated to Peter Knight’s son Quinn, 9) and Anthony Blaise. The oldies were Music For April and the closing Is the Moon Really This Far Away? This post is a rave with pics rather than a review, but I loved the new material, especially The Birds and Nine Years Later.

Satsuki Odamura

Satsuki Odamura

The main changes in line-up to Way Out West have been the addition of Odamura on kotos and Lucas Michailidis on guitar. With a new album coming out soon (more details later), the band has moved on and is entering a new era with a different feel. It works. The new pieces utilise the koto well, as well as Pereira’s diverse talents.

Lucas Michailidis and Howard Cairns

Lucas Michailidis and Howard Cairns

Michailides is another significant addition and he brings exceptional musicianship along with an ability to sync with other players.

Peter Knight on fire

Peter Knight on fire

Peter Knight on trumpet and flugel was in fine and fiery form on the horns, but for me his work on laptop in Nine Years Later was the highlight.

Paul Williamson

Paul Williamson pumps it out.

Paul Williamson is a seasoned and spectacular performer. In this outing I felt that he and Howard Cairns, along with the New York resident Raj Jayaweera did not have enough time in the spotlight. But the nature of this ensemble is that it works as a group, so it is not about solos.

That said, it would not be Way Out West without Ray Pereira in a drumming duel with someone. In this case it was guest Sri Lankan drummer Kanchana Karunaratna, who wowed the crowd with their rapid-fire technique and virtuosity.

Everyone loves a good drum stoush, but I loved this band’s layered subtlety best of all.

ROGER MITCHELL

Kanchana Karunaratna and Lucas Michailidis

Kanchana Karunaratna and Lucas Michailidis

SLIP OUT OF THOSE COMFORT ZONES

PREVIEW PART 2: Melbourne International Jazz Festival, May 30 to June 8, 2014

An earlier post mentioned some of the gigs that will attract the big crowds at this year’s festival, which artistic director Michael Tortoni has described it as “the broadest, most inclusive ever”.

Before mentioning some concerts that are a little less mainstream, it’s important to highlight the successor to a major hit of last year’s festival, which is sure to again fill Melbourne Town Hall with dancers having the time of their lives.

Swing Noir

774’s Swing Noir will be a hoot                            (Image supplied)

This year, 774’s Swing Noir concert will offer gypsy swing and hot club jazz as Swing Patrol dancers provide the inspiration and help with classic steps of the Charleston, and two bands — Ultrafox and Swingville — delve into the world of Django Reinhardt and the Hot Club of France. The festival invites the energetic to “slip on your dancing shoes, dress to kill and join us at the dawn of European jazz”. And for fans of ABC radio’s 774, the host will be Hilary Harper, who will apparently be “dazzlingly bohemian” on the night.

STRETCH YOURSELVES

It’s been said many times before, but festivals are one way to tempt music lovers to dip their toes into unfamiliar waters. Sometimes this means “jazz” becomes less of a perceived obstacle; sometimes devotees of jazz try moving outside their comfort zones.

And speaking of breaking boundaries, one significant change of this year’s MIJF is Jazz Out West, which for the first time will bring some musical events to Melbourne’s west. That’s especially exciting for Ausjazz, because there are many musicians living in this part of the city, but live music is not as prolific and does not attract the crowds of suburbs such as Northcote — yet.

Satsuki Odamura

Satsuki Odamura

The big drawcard will undoubtedly be cross-cultural sextet Peter Knight’s Way Out West at Footscray Community Arts Centre. Many will know the albums released by an earlier incarnation of this award-winning ensemble, but this outing will air new compositions written since Sydney’s koto virtuoso Satsuki Odamura and Lucas Michailidis on guitar came onboard.

Led by Peter Knight, their fascinating new project features the seamlessly combining Asian instrumentation and approaches with irresistible influenced grooves and jazz-inflected melodies. Others in this top line-up include Knight on trumpet and laptop, Howard Cairns on bass and button accordion, Paul Williamson on saxophones, Ray Pereira on percussion and Rajiv Jayaweera (rejoining the group from New York) on drums. I can’t wait to hear the new material and let’s hope there’s room for a few Westies to fit into a packed venue.

Other western offerings include Horns of Leroy — a funky brass band — at the Reverence Hotel, Hey Frankie at The Dancing Dog, Afro Beat — with an Ethiopian meal — at African Town Café Bar, and Soundwalk, in which Aboriginal elder Uncle Larry and others will lead a walking and listening tour of the streets, waterways and secret spaces of Footscray.

At last year’s MIJF crowds of younger fans crammed in to catch Snarky Puppy, and Tortoni expects similar enthusiasm for bassist Derrick Hodge and vocalist Chris Turner, who perform at The Forum.

In this “festival exclusive” billed as “exciting, cutting edge stuff on the razor’s edge of new generation jazz”, Hodge — who performed with The Robert Glasper Experiment in 2012 — and Turner — who many will recall from ERIMAJ last year — will be joined by Federico Pena and Michael Aaberg on keys, Paul Bender on bass and Mark Colenburg on drums. The combination of Hodge with Turner could take this concert in many directions.

In four gigs at Bennetts Lane, the man dubbed “probably the most dangerous drummer alive” — Chris Dave — will defy all attempts at categorisation, bringing elements of R&B, funk, rock, jazz, hip-hop and electronica via his band The Drumhedz. Expect hypnotic beats.

Serious fans of music that ventures into exciting territory must mark their digital diaries for a Malthouse double bill from Australia — Alister Spence Trio — and the USA — Dawn of Midi. Spence’s trio is well known here and accurately described as “endlessly surprising”. Brooklyn trio Dawn of Midi — Amino Belyamani piano, Aakassh Israni double bass and Qasim Naqri percussion — has been lauded for the album Dysnomia. Expect the unexpected from both trios in a concert not to be missed.

Kristin Berardi

Kristin Berardi

Also at the Malthouse, significant figures in Australian jazz — John Hoffman, Graeme Lyall, Tony Gould, Ben Robertson and Tony Floyd — get together for the first time in 20 years to form The Hunters and Pointers. Joined by award-winning vocalist Kristin Berardi, they will celebrate the release of a collection of unheard live recordings that originally featured Christine Sullivan on vocals.

Julien Wilson

Julien Wilson

Another Malthouse double bill will be a musical treat. In one set, the winner of this year’s Don Banks Music Award and member of the Jazz Bell Awards hall of fame, Mike Nock, will join his former student, drummer Laurence Pike. In the other one set, saxophonist Julien Wilson — who was a star of the 2013 Wangaratta Jazz and Blues Festival — will again visit the quartet format with New York-based pianist Barney McAll, Sydney bassist Jonathan Zwartz and Melbourne drummer Allan Browne. This double bill will not disappoint.

The Monash Art Ensemble, led by Paul Grabowsky, never disappoints, so seat belts may need to be fastened when this exciting ensemble of students and seasoned players teams with British jazz maverick, pianist and composer Django Bates and his piano trio, Belovèd. Together they will explore the music of Charlie Parker as well as Bates’ compositions.

As mentioned in the earlier preview post, Charles Lloyd’s The Greek Project clashes with an exciting world premiere of PBS Young Elder of Jazz Commission winner Tilman Robinson’s The Agony of Knowledge at Bennetts Lane Jazz Club. Robinson has demonstrated his facility for composition, so his musical exploration of the Icelandic epic poem Volsungasaga promises to be a festival highlight. The work will draw on Norse legends that have influenced music and literature for centuries, as exemplified in Wagner’s Ring Cycle and Tolkien’s The Lord of the Rings.

Sydney musicians at Deakin Edge, Fed Square will explore jazz and film in The Wires Project, a collaborative multi-media work in which vocalist Briana Cowlishaw, Gavin Ahearn on piano, Peter Koopman on guitar and Nic Cecire on drums improvise a musical response to a video by Aymeric De Meautis based on photographs by Singapore’s Chia Ming Chien. The bonus is that this experience is free.

Ausjazz had hoped to preview the intimate club sessions at MIJF 2014, which are the meat and potatoes of this festival and my favourites. Time has ruled that out, so stay tuned for further festival posts and reviews.

ROGER MITCHELL