Tag Archives: Joel Trigg

A WARM VIBE THAT JOY RADIATED

Allysha Joy

Allysha Joy performs with 30/70 Collective at The Reverence Hotel, Footscray

REVIEW

A Brother Scratch and 30/70 Collective, The Reverence Hotel, Footscray, Saturday 4 June, 2016 at 8pm for the Melbourne International Jazz Festival

I’m always keen to support live music in the western suburbs of Melbourne and the fact that Michael Tortoni, artistic director of the festival, has links to this part of town has brought a welcome stream of MIJF gigs over the past few years.

The program promised an evening of “gritty and soulful tunes” and “signature hypnotic grooves”, which pretty much turned out to be accurate. I was sure I’d be the oldest person there by some decades, which also turned out to be true.

As thoroughly uneducated in this style of music, I can’t give an informed review. There were certainly elements of hip-hop, rap, soul and jazz, so that the beat wasn’t everything and there was plenty of variation to make this interesting music.

The first set, which I assumed was 30/70 Collective, turned out to be A Brother Scratch, featuring Henry Hicks on electric bass, Ziggy Zietgiest quite prominent on drums, Thhomas Mansfield on guitar, Joel Trigg on keys and Pataphysics on trumpet and vocals.

Pataphysics provided most of the vocal input, at times using a second mic to alter his voice, but Allysha Joy sat in on vocals for a few songs, giving us a taste of the sparkle to come later. Zietgiest took a leading role, delivering “heavy set padded strolling-paced beats” — a description that I’ve pinched from a more informed reviewer (it fits). Trigg on keys made sure this set had some lively bursts.

 

The Reverence Hotel grooves to 30/70 Collective.

The Reverence Hotel grooves to 30/70 Collective.

The line-up for the second set utilised others from 30/70 Collective — Jarrod Chase took over on keys, Reuben Lewis (known in jazz circles) on trumpet, Nathaniel Sametz added trombone and Allysha Joy set some smoke drifting up before moving to the mic.

My previous meandering and fairly inconsequential post referred to the “group hug” by this group before the second set. It really did set the scene for a warm vibe that soon had the room moving as one.

I slightly preferred the second set. The horns worked well, there was at times a distinct flavour of Sun Ra and his Arkestra — it was definitely otherworldly — and on vocals Joy brought exactly what her name suggested. Her work at the mic radiated fun, energy and enjoyment, conveyed with her great voice.

In some strict sense of that ill-defined term “jazz”, this music did not fit in a “jazz festival”, but I really don’t think that matters. I was reminded strongly of the vibe at Bennetts Lane when Snarky Puppy first played to sellout audiences in 2013. The audiences loved them and here, in this packed room at The Reverence, a room full of appreciative young music lovers were having fun and grooving to this band.

ROGER MITCHELL

Some of my pics from the gig are below:

A MOVING TRIBUTE

Movement 9

Some members of Movement 9    (Image courtesy Harry Boyd-Gerny)

It’s fair to say that there is some unfinished business from 2014 that needs attention, but more of that soon.

Moving right along into 2015, Ausjazz is privileged to bring you a taste of audio-visual class from the exciting, young nonet, Movement 9, which has justifiably had rave reviews for its album Wings (four stars from John McBeath in The Weekend Australian).

That album, with a couple of guests and a different line-up, featured mostly compositions by alto saxophonist Joe McEvilly. It has been played a lot in this house and on the road.

Formed in 2012, Movement 9‘s gigs have been described by Canberra Jazz as “a joyous playtime… big, bold sounds and indulgent grooves”.

In its latest incarnation, Movement 9 features McEvilly alto sax & compositions, Tom Sly trumpet, Niran Dasika trumpet, Patrick Langdon trombone, Paul Cornelius tenor sax, Nick McCusker baritone sax, Joel Trigg piano & keyboard, Jordan Tarento double & electric bass and James Milic on drums.

Wings featured Ax Long trumpet, Tom Sly trumpet, Patrick Langdon trombone, Matt Handel alto sax, Oisin Smith-Coburn tenor sax, Tate Sheridan piano, Rafael Jerjen bass, Henry Rasmussen drums and Joe McEvilly baritone saxophone, with guests John Mackey (tenor sax) and Miroslav Bukovsky (trumpet).

Anyway, enough background to whet the appetite. Joe tells me this brand new song, titled Without Knowing, was recorded and filmed live at Sing Sing Studios with a four-man crew. It is a tribute to Swedish pianist the late Esbjorn Svensson, “beloved for the austere beauty of his melodies and the depth of his grooves, who was taken well before his time in a scuba diving accident”.

He explains that, “I hadn’t been listening to the Esbjorn Svensson Trio/EST long before he died, but their music had already made a lifelong impression on me. The first track of theirs that I ever heard was Seven Days of Falling, when Sandy Evans played it for me in high school. I’ve remembered that moment ever since.”

So, watch Movement 9 perform Without Knowing and enjoy:

Joe McEvilly would like to acknowledge that the whole project was funded by a generous patron (in the form of a “privately funded arts grant”) to whom we are deeply indebted. He is not naming names, so applause please to be passed on to whom it may be due.

On behalf of Movement 9, Joe says that if you enjoy the music, and if you have a YouTube account (or Gmail/Google account), you could do the band a huge favour by clicking the Thumbs Up icon or leaving a short comment on the video page to them us reach a wider audience. Shares on Facebook will also be welcomed.

We look forward to more music — and another album — from Movement 9 when time and finances permit.

ROGER MITCHELL

AN ITALIAN COLLABORATION

Enrico Rava

Enrico Rava                       (Image supplied)

ALBUM LAUNCH:

The Monash Sessions: Enrico Rava, Thursday 30 October at Bennetts Lane Jazz Club in Melbourne

It has become a tradition for Monash University to arrange for its students of improvised music to learn from some of the world’s great jazz musicians, either by having them visit or by taking the students overseass. The results of these working sessions have resulted in significant recordings in The Monash Sessions project — a recording initiative by Associate Professor and Head of School, Robert Burke, and Jazzhead.

Now, before Italy’s trumpet maestro Enrico Rava makes his headline appearance at the Wangaratta Festival of Jazz & Blues, Jazzhead is thrilled to announce the release of the 11-track album The Monash Sessions: Enrico Rava. The album will effectively be launched twice, on Thursday 30 October at Bennetts Lane Jazz Club in Melbourne and on the following evening at Wangaratta. Rava, in Australia for the first time, will be joined by staff and students.

In December last year, 35 jazz students from the Sir Zelman Cowen School of Music travelled to the Monash University Prato Centre in Italy to undertake an intensive three-week performance unit. As part of their study, students were given the opportunity to perform and record with Rava, one of the seminal figures of the European jazz scene.

Rava, an ECM artist, has released over 50 albums during his career, performing alongside greats such as Gil Evans, Cecil Taylor, Joe Henderson, John Abercrombie, Pat Metheny, and Dave Douglas.

The Monash Sessions: Enrico Rava was mixed and mastered at the Sonoria Recording Plant in Prato, Italy, by Andrea Benassai, and produced by Robert Burke and Mirko Guerrini.

It features music faculty members Paul Grabowsky (piano), Rob Burke and Mirko Guerrini (saxophones), Stephen Magnusson (guitar) as well as students Josh Kelly (alto), Paul Cornelius (tenor), Stephen Byth (tenor), pianists Daniel Mougerman and Joel Trigg, bassists Josh Manusama and Hiroki Hoshino, and drummers Rob Mercer, Cameron Sexton and Zeke Ruckman.

Jazzhead describes this album, recorded over two days, as having “a distinct Italian approach”, and being “relaxed but distinctly intense”. “Noted are the beautiful trumpet sound and passionate lyrical lines produced by Rava, conveying potent meaning and harmonic perfection.”

MONASH SESSIONS: ENRICO RAVA – TOUR DATES

Oct 30 Bennetts Lane, Melbourne
Oct 31 WPAC Theatre, Wangaratta Jazz Festival