Tag Archives: Freedman Jazz Fellowship

HANNAFORD COPS THE CASH

Marc Hannaford

Marc Hannaford

BREAKING NEWS:

Pianist extraordinaire Marc Hannaford is the 2013 recipient of the Freedman Jazz Fellowship.

Marc was listed as being a Brisbane entrant, but the Melbourne jazz community has long since adopted him as our own. So, yea for Marc!

Last night Marc, Raj JayaweeraAaron Flower and Jeremy Rose performed with their bands  before respected judges Andrew Robson, Tim Firth, and Alister Spence in The Studio at the Sydney Opera House.

Marc, who performed with Sam Pankhurst on bass and James McLean on drums, won $15,000 cash.

Congratulations to Marc and to the other three for making it to the finals.

It is expected that Marc will have a smile on his face when he performs with David Tolley, Allan Browne, Ren Walters and Scott Tinkler tonight (August 6) at Bennetts Lane as part of the VIVIFICATION Series.

Everything is going splendidly for Marc, bless him, who leaves Melbourne soon for New York to take up a five-year fellowship to complete a PhD in music theory.

The Freedman Music Fellowships, administered by the Music Council of Australia, provide two prizes of $15,000 cash for a jazz and a classical musician.

Established in 1998 by Laurence and Kathy Freedman, The Freedman Foundation also supports visual artists, Australian youth projects, scientific and medical research.

ROGER MITCHELL

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OPERA HOUSE VENUE FOR BIG DEBATE

PREVIEW:

Forget for a moment the prospect of debates between Opposition (pause) Leader (pause) Tony (pause) Abbott (pause) and fair-suck-of-the-sauce-bottle Kevin (frankly, let be be quite clear about this) Rudd. The musical debate about to unfold tonight in Sydney is bound to be more engrossing, if less bloody.

Tonight four of Australia’s musicians play off in The Studio at the Sydney Opera House for the $15,000 cash Freedman Jazz Fellowship.

All the best to Marc Hannaford, Raj Jayaweera, Aaron Flower and Jeremy Rose as they perform with their bands  and front up to interviews before respected jazz musicians Andrew Robson, Tim Firth, and Alister Spence, who will be judging.

The finalists vying for this prestigious fellowship are all exciting. Marc  is leaving Melbourne soon for New York soon to take up a five-year fellowship to complete a PhD in music theory; drummer Raj  is now based in New York; Sydney guitarist Aaron Flower won the 2007 National Jazz Guitar Awards; and saxophonist Jeremy Rose won the 2009 Bell Award for Young Australian Jazz Artist of the Year.

The Freedman Music Fellowships, administered by the Music Council of Australia, provide two prizes of $15,000 cash for a jazz and a classical musician.

Publicity material for the concert includes the following profiles (but not the images):

Marc Hannaford

Marc Hannaford

Marc Hannaford (piano, Brisbane) is known as one of the exciting improvising pianists in Australia. His multi-faceted and energetic music combines elements of the American and Australian jazz traditions, South Indian classical music and Flamenco. Marc has released four CDs under his own name and his work has been recognised with awards and nominations.

Raj Jayaweera

Raj Jayaweera

Rajiv Jayaweera (drummer, New York-based) was born in London of Sri Lankan heritage but grew up in Melbourne. He moved to New York in 2011 to do his Masters in Jazz Studies where he studied with Professor John Riley. He regularly performs at Birdland Jazz Club with The Louis Armstrong Centennial Band and has travelled widely performing at jazz festivals and playing with musicians such as Cyrille Aimee, the Kenny Werner Trio, Gilad Hekselman and Chris Cheek.

Aaron Flower

Aaron Flower plays Wangaratta Jazz

Aaron Flower (guitar, Sydney) is a regular on the Sydney music scene and has performed with jazz greats both here and overseas and in 2007 he won the National Jazz Guitar Award. He plays and records with bands including his own, BAZ, whose last album was shortlisted for the Jazz Bell Award in 2011. That same year he started Yum Yum Tree Records a collective and label which aims to promote music from 2003 – 2010.

Karen-Steains

Jeremy Rose        (Supplied picture by Karen-Steains)

Jeremy Rose (saxophone, Sydney) has played the saxophone at major festivals around Australia, as well as performances in Japan, Norway and Canada. He has studied with top artists around the world and released nine albums of original music with his various projects. He is becoming increasingly known as a composer for ensembles such as Ku-ring-gai Philharmonic, Sirens Big Band and Compass Quartet.

Established in 1998 by Laurence and Kathy Freedman, The Freedman Foundation also supports visual artists, Australian youth projects, scientific and medical research.

ROGER MITCHELL

AUDIENCE APPLAUSE A FITTING CODA

Sylvan Coda

Vocalists Jacq Gawler, Emma Gilmartin and Gian Slater, with Julian Banks, perform with Sylvan Coda at Bennetts Lane.

REVIEW: Christopher Hale’s Sylvan Coda, presented by the Melbourne Jazz Co-operative at Bennetts Lane Jazz Club, 9 pm Tuesday 12 February 2013

This was a fantastic gig — one that will long sustain those who were there to hear it and cause those who missed out to wish they had managed to make it. Sylvan Coda live demonstrated the power of performers who are right there so close you can almost touch them and who create electricity so tangible you can almost feel the audience glowing.

I could not help recalling Carlos Saura’s film Flamenco, which has no story other than dance, yet is absolutely compelling from start to finish.

I also must own up to a conversion of sorts. The inventive choral work of Gian Slater with Invenio has not always grabbed me, if only because the wordless repetition — while exquisitely rendered — has seemed at times not to allow the singers to take the audience on enough of a journey. Clear exceptions to this are Slater’s 2010 APRA Commission work Gone Without Saying, and her late 2012 outing at Northcote Town Hall entitled Self/Echo and Clarion/Whisper, both of which were superb. But when Slater’s voice joined those of Emma Gilmartin and Jacq Gawler (Coco’s Lunch) for Sylvan Coda, I became a convert. It was wordless and it was repetitive, but it worked so well in the context of Hale’s composition. Drama and intensity were complemented by vocal beauty.

The Sylvan Coda album launched last year features Hale, Gian Slater, Nathan Slater on nylon string guitar, Julian Banks on tenor sax, Ben Vanderwal on drums, Javier Fredes  on percussion), Denis Close on snare drums, caxixis (small basket filled with seeds) and repinique (Brazilian drum), Johnny Tedesco  on cajon and palmas (hand percussion), Richard Tedesco on frame drums and palmas and Lachlan Carrick on effects and textural percussion.

The album is impressive. It is a powerful work. But I believe the addition of Gawler and Gilmartin, Danny Fischer on drums and, of course, the accomplished physicality of Johnny Tedesco’s flamenco in Solea por Bulerias gave so much feeling, life and energy to this performance of Sylvan Coda that the character of the work changed. The album has a sombre feel in parts, but the live outing added verve and focus. I found one duet by Gilmartin and Gian Slater entrancing.

The sustained applause that greeted the ensemble at the evening’s end spoke volumes. This was a coda to remember.

ROGER MITCHELL

See also:

The review in The Age by Jessica Nicholas

Pictures from Sylvan Coda live:

Nathan Slater

Nathan Slater

Gian Slater

Gian Slater

Jacq Gawler

Jacq Gawler

Emma Gilmartin and Gian Slater

Emma Gilmartin and Gian Slater

Emma Gilmartin

Emma Gilmartin

Johnny Tedesco and Chris Hale

Johnny Tedesco and Chris Hale

Johnny Tedesco

In full flight: Johnny Tedesco

Johnny Tedesco

Rhythm: Johnny Tedesco

Gian Slater and Julian Banks

Gian Slater and Julian Banks

Sylvan Coda

Which Way Music has released the album Sylvan Coda.

See also:

The review in The Age by Jessica Nicholas