Tag Archives: 2016

WOMEN COME UP TRUMPS – AGAIN

Laila Biaili

Laila Biali                      Image supplied

PREVIEW

19th Melbourne Women’s International Jazz Festival, December 4-11, 2016, Bennett’s Lane Jazz Club

On the eve of Donald Trump taking the reins in the United States of America, it seems appropriate — and indeed vital — for women and men of Australia (as Gough Whitlam used to say, albeit not in that order) to come out and enjoy music mostly created and played by women.

Artists from Canada, Brisbane, Sydney and Melbourne will share the products of their lifestyle choices over eight days from Sunday, December 4. And in that bittersweet way of a top festival, there will be clashes — occasions when you will be torn between gigs that you won’t want to miss, but must choose between.

Opening night will feature Jann Rutherford Memorial Award winner, pianist Emma Stephenson — along with Nick Henderson (bass) and Oli Nelson (drums) as Hieronymus Trio — in collaboration with inventive vocalist Gian Slater. Stephenson has composed new material and reworked earlier compositions for this performance. Slater has been a finalist in the Freedman Fellowship in 2004 and 2010, The National Jazz Awards in 2005, and the Bell Awards for Best Jazz Vocal Album in 2010 and 2013. Hieronymus Trio has been mentored by Ari Hoenig, John Riley, Aaron Goldberg, Craig Scott, Simon Barker and Matt McMahon.

On Monday, December 5 the festival student night will celebrate emerging female musicians with a line-up featuring performers from Loreto Toorak, Stonnington Youth Jazz Initiative, Lowther Hall and Ringwood Secondary College.

Tuesday, December 6 brings an opportunity to hear prolific composer and pianist Andrea Keller with Stephen Magnusson guitar and James McLean on drums in Transients V, one of her trios inspired by the philosophy and legacy of esteemed mentor Allan Browne. Based on a collective approach to music making, the trios perform original compositions, improvisations, as well as selections from the American and Australian songbooks.

Canadian multi-award winning pianist and vocalist Laila Biali appears for her first Australia performance with countrymen Adam Thomas (drums) and Joel Fountain (bass) on Wednesday, December 7. Laila has performed at the North Sea Jazz Festival in the Netherlands, Tokyo’s Cotton Club and Carnegie Hall. She has toured with Grammy award winners Chris Botti, Paula Cole and Suzanne Vega, recorded with and supported Sting and was “Keyboardist of the Year” at Canada’s National Jazz Awards.

On Thursday, December 8, Emma Gilmartin will join James Sherlock (guitar), Frank Di Sario (double bass) and Danny Fischer (drums) to launch her album The Emma Gilmartin Quartet: Live at Bennetts Lane recorded by Niko Schauble of Pughouse Studios. They will play standards and original compositions.

Two shows on Friday, December 9 highlight the extraordinary abilities of Melbourne’s creative women jazz artists.

In the Jazz Lab, Kennedy Snow featuring Nina Ferro presents originals from the recently released debut album Follow, the result of a longtime collaboration between Nina (recently returned from a decade residency in London) and Kennedy Snow (aka drummer Sonja Horbelt). Follow encompasses such styles as Neo-Soul, R&B, jazz and heart stopping ballads. They will also debut some new tunes, and play Ferro originals and  classic R&B interpretations. The line-up will include long-time collaborators Kellie Santin (saxes) and Kim May (bass) with special guest Steve Sedergreen on piano and keys.

And in a special treat next door certain to set up a most difficult choice for patrons, the festival and Melbourne Jazz Co-operative co-present a solo piano double bill featuring friends and colleagues Nat Bartsch and Andrea Keller. These two extraordinary women pianists, composers and improvisers will share their unique sounds and distinctive work in a concert not be be missed.

And on Saturday, December 10, setting up another festival clash of competing drawcards, acclaimed Brisbane vocalist Kristin Berardi and The Balloons present work from her latest Bell Award winning album Where or When in the Jazz Lab. Appearing with Kristin are formidable Australian musicians on this ABC record release Julien Wilson (sax), James Sherlock (guitar), Steve Newcomb (piano) and Sam Anning (bass).

In the Jazz Room, MJC co-presents the composer Cheryl Durongpisitkul on saxophone, clarinet and flute in her octet with Felix Watson (trumpet), James Macaulay (trombone), Marcos Villalta (guitar), Lincoln Mckenzie (guitar), Harry Cook (piano), Stephen Hornby (double bass) and Leo Kavanagh (drums). Durongpisitkul has spent the past year writing a cohesive, narrative based piece, heavily influenced by Igor Stravinsky’s Petrushka. Cheryl’s approach to music making is described as adventurous, quirky, beautiful and at times chaotic, ranging from contemporary jazz to third stream.

The festival closes on Sunday, December 11 with Spirograph Studies led by bassist Tamara Murphy, winner of the inaugural Young Elder of Jazz Commission for the Melbourne International Jazz Festival. Spirograph Studies takes a detailed, textural approach to improvised music. Inventors of the ‘gromp’, this strong collection of music-makers each bring their unique voice to the stage in a collaborative approach featuring Luke Howard (piano), Fran Swinn (guitar) and James McLean (drums).

For full program details visit the MWIJF website and Bennetts Lane.

The Melbourne Women’s International Jazz festival gratefully acknowledges financial assistance from major sponsors APRA AMCOS, Fraser Place Melbourne, The Canada Council for the Arts, Melbourne Jazz Co-operative and Brolly Design.

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BRANDIS-ING LIFESTYLE CHOICES

Sandy Evans

Sandy Evans performs at Wangaratta Festival of Jazz & Blues

REVIEW

Wangaratta Festival of Jazz & Blues 2016

There is a political dimension to the performance of live music that often goes unmentioned. Yet it was present at this year’s Wangaratta Festival of Jazz & Blues, whether in frequent black-humoured mentions of “lifestyle choices” (the products of which apparently we were hearing onstage) or in passing comments that did not reflect well on Attorney-General and former arts minister George Brandis, who is widely blamed for funding cuts to the arts.

It was also obvious in the program, which featured fewer international artists, and in what appeared from observation to be fewer bums on seats — both a result of this renowned and much-loved music festival having to significantly tighten the purse strings. Let’s hope — and work towards — that situation improving in the years to come. This annual gathering of jazz and blues musicians has a proud history.

It was apposite, in this context, that multi-instrumentalist Adam Simmons included, in a set by the trio Origami in St Patrick’s Hall, three pieces from The Usefulness of Art, an album inspired by Rodin that reflects on what artistic experience and participation can offer society — acceptance, empathy, generosity, compassion and faith — “at a time when fear governs politics rather than vision and principles, at a time when we cannot offer our hand to those in need, at a time when support for music education is diminishing”.

Mind you, those wise sentiments come from a musician who plays in his socks, which are often red.

And these layabouts who have chosen to fiddle with their instruments on stage rather than doing a real job are almost certainly commos. For instance, flamboyant pianist Barney McAll tore up a picture of Donald Trump live on stage in the Wangaratta Performing Arts Centre Theatre during a performance by his band ASIO (Australian Symbiotic Improvisers Orbit).

And the program devised by the festival’s prominent and no doubt left-wing artistic director (or creative director as he is known this year) Adrian Jackson is clearly leading a gender-based assault on the world of jazz, displaying as the line-up did “the strength and diversity of female jazz and blues artists, whether as vocalists, instrumentalists, bandleaders and composers”.

But I digress. Wasn’t this review supposed to be about music?

There is no single feature that makes any session of live music work for an audience, and no audience that is entirely of one mind. Yet many times an audience will feel and go with the vibe, delighting in whatever works collectively — be it virtuosic playing, full-on hard bop, intricacy and subtlety, or various forms of complexity. That is hardly an exhaustive list.

On Friday night Paul Grabowsky and Monash Art Ensemble joined Daniel and David Wilfred from Arnhem Land in a performance of Nyilipidgi that some found challenging. It was not my first experience of this work, which probably helped, and I thought it allowed two musical traditions — modern jazz and Indigenous ceremony — to cohere powerfully and emotively. The Wilfred brothers were expressive in their movements, although they did not dance as in a previous performance I’d seen.

The Long Way Around, Ronan Guilfoyle’s trio from Ireland, displayed understanding as well as propulsion and intensity in what was a fairly restrained outing.

And to close the evening, award-winning Chilean expatriate saxophonist Melissa Aldana formed Crash Trio with countryman Pablo Menares on bass and Colin Stranahan (US) on drums in a concert that never seemed to move or excite. Aldana displayed fluidity and technical expertise, but on this occasion lacked that indefinable ability to make us captives to her talent.

I made it to a dozen concerts on Saturday, but for too many of those I did not hear all of each gig because of overlapping concerts. Pianist Andrea Keller — whose contributions to this festival were a highlight — joined Eugene Ball on trumpet and Tamara Murphy on bass for Transients IV, one of Keller’s trios inspired by and in memory of the late Allan Browne. There was so much magnetism and space in the originals they played that I did not want to leave.

It was also a treat to hear expatriate trombonist Shannon Barnett and her fellow band member from Germany Stefan Karl Schmid on saxophone perform with Monash University Big Band, assuredly demonstrating under the direction of Jordan Murray that there are many young, talented “lifestyle choice” enthusiasts out there.

It often doesn’t work to hear half a concert, but festival programs make that hard to avoid. In Holy Trinity Cathedral at noon on Saturday, however, Luke Howard on piano along with Jonathan Zion on bass and Danny Farrugia on drums were superb advocates for their album The Electric Night Descends. This intricate, layered and beautiful music swelled and receded in the lofty space, its mesmeric quality staying with me long afterwards, despite my early departure from the set.

This uplifting mood was built upon in Celebrating Bernie McGann, Sandy Evans on tenor sax and Andrew Robson on alto joining Warwick Alder on trumpet, Brendan Clarke on bass and Andrew Dickeson on drums in a tribute to the inspirational musician who died in 2013. Evans said some of McGann’s compositions were “the best of all time” before the quartet performed her commissioned four-part suite, Loose, Long, Taste, Groove. We heard sprightly and sharp trumpet, a marvellous maelstrom of sound, twanging resonance and splendid horns mingling. Evans played with heart, soul, presence, spirit, feeling — call it what you will — and Robson sent alto notes darting as he ducked and weaved behind the music stand. It was indeed a celebration.

At 2.30pm the Luke Howard Trio members emerged from their telephone box clad in the colours of saxophonist Anton Delecca’s quartet and the transformation worked. I heard only the first half, but the versatility of these players exemplified the fact that they don’t get to take on a lifestyle choice without hard work. And it pays … well, not in big bucks maybe, but in the music that emerges.

Pianist Tal Cohen was unable to return from the US for a duet performance with saxophonist Jamie Oehlers, but Paul Grabowsky stepped into the breach. These two know each other so well. During their exquisite rendition of Armistice I vividly recalled the soft pastel hues of Afghan sunsets, and Oehlers’ work in The Dreaming was air-filled subtlety as the duo explored simple patterns. But the high point of this outing for me was a fully improvised piece that recalled their engrossing Lost and Found album. It’s a wonderful device to go unscripted — a tiny element of suspense demands our attention as we wonder where will they take the piece, who’s changing the mood or tempo or dynamics, and how will they know when to end it.

Jazz critic for a Murdoch publication John McBeath has described the Joseph O’Connor Trio as “an important new Australian talent” and he’s not wrong. O’Connor says the trio’s first album Praxis is inspired by his “study of dissonant counterpoint” and “combine a spacious, non-tonal harmonic palette with an intricate rhythmic sensibility”. I’d express it more simply by saying that it is not necessary to understand fully the complexity or intricacy of the structures this band explores to find it absorbing and engrossing. It really is worth an attentive listen and deeply satisfying.

The evening session on Saturday brought two festival highlights, the first being Ronan Guilfoyle’s eight-part suite A Shy-Going Boy, which set out to explore duality, complexity and ambiguity in the life of his grandfather, Joseph Guilfoyle, who was a volunteer in the 1916 Rising in Ireland. Voice recordings were a powerful adjunct to this carefully crafted set of pieces that, for instance, changed from jaunty and bright to sombre lament within A Dog With Two Tails. Ronan was joined by son Chris on guitar, Matt Jacobson on drums and Australians Scott Tinkler on trumpet, Jamie Oehlers on sax and Andrea Keller on piano. It was a challenging and sobering work of a similar ilk to Lloyd Swanton’s Ambon, but not on the same scale.

Shannon Barnett

Shannon Barnett

The audience in St Pat’s Hall at 9.15pm heard Shannon Barnett in her element, joined by her German group of Stefan Karl Schmid, David Helm on bass and Fabian Arends on drums, playing her compositions. This was a special outing for Barnett’s many fans and a musical treat, full of warmth and depth in the air-cushioned horns that seem to call for the epithet “resplendent” as they flow upwards and outwards from the stage. I loved the timbres and the finesse and restraint of the drums, as well as the traditional jazz feel of Hope Solo. Barnett’s characteristic humour showed through. An error in the festival app led me to miss this quartet’s second outing next day, which was a great pity.

The Wangaratta debut by bassist Tamara Murphy’s Spirograph Studies took quite a different approach that eschewed solos in favour of a group ethos as band members took a more textural and developmental approach to each piece. I did not catch the whole performance, but found it hard to resist the desire for more variation or more movement towards a destination. This is a group to watch.

Melissa Aldana

Melissa Aldana steps up her intensity.

Before a visit to the Blues Marquee to hear Geoff Achison I heard the opening piece of Melissa Aldana’s Crash Trio. It was New Points and Aldana continued to deliver fluidity in her long solos, but seemed to have stepped up the level of intensity compared with her previous night’s outing.
The last thing you need on a Sunday morning is Confrontations, but that’s what Joseph O’Connor’s trio with Scott Tinkler on trumpet delivered in spades. This five-piece suite was written as his PBS Young Elder of Jazz commission. It was utterly compelling in WPAC Hall, but not at all as I had imagined or as the title suggested. It’s not my place to infringe on an artist’s naming rights, but surely interactions, intersections, juxtaposings or congruities may have fitted just as well. There were deep raspings and higher register explorations from Tinkler, and fragmented, percussive piano onslaughts from O’Connor. But there were exquisite eddies and currents in there too, along with quite beautiful and gentle interventions as paths criss-crossed and patterns formed and dissolved. The tension-filled Blocks ended a great outing.

Ronan Guilfoyle is not only an accomplished composer for diverse ensembles and bass guitarist, he is evidently well versed in a wide range of musical traditions. When his trio performed in WPAC Hall the first three pieces drew on New Orleans funk, a reggae groove and North African gnawa rhythms. At times I found the drums too strong for intricate and well executed guitar work by Chris Guilfoyle, but the final piece I heard, Not Too Chabby, built to a stirring finale that was, well, you guessed it, not too shabby at all.

At 1pm in WPAC Theatre I caught the opening three pieces by a stirring sextet led by saxophonist Kellie Santin, who returned to Melbourne some time ago after 11 years in London. This was a swinging band that obviously enjoyed what they were doing — it is a lifestyle choice after all — and they were tight and lively. As they played Save Your Love For Me, Street Life and Do Nothing Till You Hear From Me, it was obvious that Santin had wooed and won quite a few audiences in her career and this outing was going to be polished and professional.

I left for something completely different. Adam Simmons on soprano sax and Nick Tsiavos on contrabass were playing Sixteen Allelulias at Holy Trinity. Indulge me here as I wax lyrical, albeit perhaps not as much as this duo.

As I listened to this constantly liminal exchange between two artists of sound, I remarked on their understanding, their exquisite timing, the deliberateness of their interventions and the contrast in their instrumentation — deeply resonant bass, air-filled saxophone notes. Their periods of unison were broken by slight extensions or delays. The bass notes deepen, the sax holds back. They exchange a look, then Simmons bounces in, but never overplays. They are a study in empathy and in listening (it is part of many lifestyle choices, after all). Sax notes seem to be exquisitely laid upon the bass notes, or poured on to them. The result is iridescent.

Past tense returns: It was almost big clash time, and crunch time. I wanted to hear Sandy Evans Trio with Bobby Singh on tabla, as well as Barney McAll’s ASIO. The resultant switch was jarring to say the least.

At 2.30pm in WPAC Hall Evans launched into an amazingly intense and rhythmically compelling solos over a drone, before Singh began on tablas. They played a Sri Lankan tune and then Robben Island from their album Kapture, a tribute to anti-apartheid activist Ahmed Kathrada who was imprisoned with Nelson Mandela for 26 years. I wanted to hear more. Much more.

But at 3pm I was next door ready — but utterly unprepared — for McAll’s ASIO. There were four men in Hi Vis vests ready to create chaos for their leader, but often seemingly wondering what he would require of them next. McAll held up signs with assorted instructions (“Make bird calls”?), tore up a picture of Donald Trump and talked wildly of parking tickets paid, needing milk and finding a 7-Eleven. He also distorted his voice in a most effective fashion via his synthesiser.

As usual with this creative performer, amid all this absolute and utter craziness there were sobering moments, as when he referred to a piece written about people “who appear to have everything, but don’t”. And McAll said judging the National Jazz Awards was “one of the hardest things I’ve had to do” — and we believed him.

Speaking of those awards, Adam Simmons mentioned just before the final judging that he had entered three times and had no success. So, as he said, there was hope for those who missed out.

National Jazz Awards winner for 2016 Mike Rivett

National Jazz Awards winner for 2016 Mike Rivett

The results were as follows: 1st Mike Rivett (Cairns), 2nd Troy Roberts (Perth) and 3rd Jeremy Rose (Sydney). Congratulations to those three and all who made the final 10 who performed in heats during the festival.

Anyone still reading at this point deserves a national jazz reader award. Sorry, no prizes.

At 7pm Melbourne Jazz Cooperative’s Martin Jackson introduced Andrea Keller’s Transients I, featuring Julien Wilson on tenor and bass clarinet, and Sam Anning on double bass. This began with Allan Browne’s Cyclosporin and ended with Hand Me Downs. In between we heard wonderful compositions by Keller and Anning. Keller’s tribute to the late John Taylor, a pianist and mentor, entitled Grateful, Hopeful, Joyful, was breathtakingly beautiful — Julien Wilson take a bow here. (But remember, there’s no money in it, because it’s a lifestyle choice.)

And I thought it would all be over after the 9pm outing by the Melbourne Women’s International Jazz Festival Quintet, which included Angela Davis’s moving Hymn For the Lonely and Keller’s tribute to John Taylor. Zoe Hauptmann on bass had met drummer Sonja Horbelt that morning. Surely this was a fitting way to end a festival in which many women musicians put their lifestyle choices on the line.

James Morrison

What a line-up: Olivia Chindamo, Troy Roberts , Matt Jodrell, James Morrison, Patrick Danao, Harry Morrison.

But it was not to be. The Morrison clan had other plans.

That’s James Morrison (on trumpet, trombone, piano and — at the Pinsent Hotel later on double bass), William Morrison on guitar and the amazingly speedy and dextrous Harry Morrison on bass. They gathered Troy Roberts (tenor), Carl Mackay (alto), Matt Jodrell (trumpet and piano), Patrick Danao (drums) and Olivia Chindamo (vocal gymnastics) in an all-out extravaganza that wowed an absolutely packed WPAC Theatre.

That’s a whole lot of people in that audience that went away with a smile on their faces because of lifestyle choices.

Down at the Pinsent Hotel were a few more of those layabouts on stage who had no real jobs. But what happens at the Pinsent stays at the Pinsent.

ROGER MITCHELL

Note to self: Write something soon about the festival app that was far from accurate or complete. And add some images.

WHAT WANGARATTA’S DISHING UP

Bernie McGann

Bernie McGann will be celebrated at Wangaratta this year.

PREVIEW

Wangaratta Festival of Jazz & Blues, October 28-30, 2016

It’s a little late for a preview of a festival that opens this week, but it seems wrong not to take a look into the crystal ball and consider the delights of this year’s Wangaratta Festival of Jazz & Blues, which opens for the 27th time on Friday.

Adrian Jackson, creative director and for many years the linchpin of this pre-Cup Day long weekend feast of music, has said an “after the fact” theme is “the strength and diversity of female jazz and blues artists, whether as vocalists, instrumentalists, bandleaders and composers”. They were not chosen to fit any such label or description, but “included on merit”. As AJ says, that’s the way it should be.

Rather than begin with international artists — who Jackson acknowledges are not so well known as in some past years — I’ve decided to run through the gigs that I plan to catch (more jazz than blues, I expect). After all, a look through the long list of concerts on offer (and planning to avoid the inevitable clashes) is like poring over the menu at a really great restaurant on a special occasion — you can’t order every dish, but anticipating the dishes on offer is half the fun.

The first item on the agenda for any serious festival patron is to download the app for iPhone or Android. It was a huge success last year and will make planning your musical meal so much easier.

I will miss not being able to turn up to the Wangaratta library for one of Miram Zolin’s late afternoon book launches on Friday, because they’ve offered a great chance to catch up with friends — musicians and festival regulars.

But at 7.30pm I reckon on catching a few minutes of Irish trio The Long Way Round (featuring Ronan Guilfoyle bass, Chris Guilfoyle guitar and Matthew Jacobson drums) in St Patricks Hall.

Daniel Wilfred

Daniel Wilfred

Then, in WPAC Theatre at 8pm, Monash Art Ensemble, directed by Paul Grabowsky AO, will join Daniel Ngukurr Boy Wilfred (voice, didjeridu, clapsticks, dance) and David Yipinni Wilfred (didjeridu, dance) to present Nyilipidgi. Expect drama, strong rhythms, and considerable impact.

At 10.30pm we’ll hear expatriate Chilean Melissa Aldana, now living in New York, on tenor sax, which is appropriate as the National Jazz Awards this year will feature saxophonists. The first female instrumentalist and the first South American to win the prestigious Thelonious Monk International Jazz Competition, Aldana will join countryman Pablo Menares (bass) and Cuban drummer Kush Abadey to deliver originals and standards, performing as Crash Trio. Thom Jurek (Allmusic) describes their music as “fresh, sophisticated, invigorating modern jazz”.

Monique diMattina will be at the Pinsent Hotel until midnight.

That’s surely enough to get the juices flowing for the days and nights ahead.

Tough choices abound on Saturday, but Andrea Keller’s Transients IV — one of her trios inspired by the philosophy and legacy of Allan Browne — takes the WPAC Hall stage at 10.30am, featuring Eugene Ball on trumpet, Keller on piano and Tamara Murphy on double bass.

Shannon Barnett

Shannon Barnett with her quartet at Wangaratta in 2013.

At 11am I’ll have to slip into WPAC Theatre to welcome our expatriate trombonist Shannon Barnett back from Cologne, Germany and hear her regular quartet members Stefan Karl Schmid saxophone/clarinet, David Helm bass and Fabian Arends drums along with Monash University Big Band. It will be a treat to hear what Europe has gained and we’ve lost.

Lunch at noon? Forget that. Music from The Electric Night Descends is sure to be featured in Holy Trinity Cathedral from noon when Luke Howard on piano joins Jonathan Zion bass and Daniel Farrugia drums. Ronan Guilfoyle’s trio is in St Pat’s Hall from 12.30pm, but I’ll be hoping to catch them on Sunday.

I will not be missing Celebrating Bernie McGann in WPAC Theatre at 1pm, when Warwick Alder, Brendan Clarke and Andrew Dickeson — Bernie’s quartet during the last period of his life — share the stage with Sandy Evans and Andrew Robson on saxes. Along with McGann’s music, this concert will feature a suite — Long, Loose, Taste, Groove — in which Evans pays tribute to her long-time collaborator and friend.

Hard to know which way to turn at this point, but I’m aiming to catch a little Anton Delecca Quartet in WPAC Hall at 2.30pm before slipping into WPAC Theatre at 3pm to hear Jamie Oehlers and Tal Cohen play pieces from Innocent Dreamer, their new album of originals and standards.

The inimitable, virtuosic and thoroughly charismatic Barney McAll playing solo is an appealing prospect in the cathedral at 4pm, but in WPAC Hall at 4.30pm Joseph O’Connor’s Trio will join Scott Tinkler and I’m hoping there may be a few Confrontations — no promises, because I really don’t know what they plan to play.

I expect to eat a little at this point to keep my strength up for the evening ahead.

At 8.30pm I am keen to hear Ronan Guilfoyle’s eight-part suite entitled A Shy-Going Boy, which explores the life and times of his grandfather, Irish revolutionary Joe Guilfoyle. I’m predicting this WPAC Theatre concert to be a festival highlight.

As soon as that finishes I’ll be off to St Pat’s Hall at 10pm-ish to soak up the Shannon Barnett Quartet. But wait, that clashes with Tamara Murphy’s Spirograph Studies in WPAC Hall.

And Melissa Aldana and Crash Trio begin at 10.30pm in WPAC Theatre and on the blues stage Geoff Achison & the Soul Diggers are an old favourite of mine.

There are delicious morsels on the menu and my belly is way too large as it is. Clashes! They are inevitable. And I have no hair left to pull out.

Time for bed.

Sunday may begin for me at 10.30am in WPAC Hall to hear Joseph O’Connor Trio (this time there will be Confrontations, a suite of six compositions that embody conflict and multiplicity in improvisation, composed with the support of PBS radio’s Young Elder of Jazz commission) followed by more from Shannon Barnett’s quartet at 11am in WPAC Theatre.

At 12.30pm in WPAC Hall I’ll be keen to hear Ronan Guilfoyle Trio, no doubt finding it hard to tear myself away at 1pm to hear the crooning and wailing reeds of Melbourne saxophonist Kellie Santin, who spent 11 years in London before returning in 2013. Santin will be joined by Christian Barbieri guitar, Phil Turcio keyboards, Marty Holoubek bass, Salvador Persico percussion and Darryn Farrugia drums.

But I hear the sound of clashing concerts again. In Holy Trinity at 1.30pm Adam Simmons and Nick Tsiavos ought not to be missed as they explore a collection of Sixteen Alleluias via soprano sax and acoustic bass.

And — clash, clash, clash go the festival cymbals — at 2.30pm in WPAC Hall tabla player Bobby Singh joins the great Sandy Evans and her trio of bass player Brett Hirst and drummer Toby Hall in a concert featuring excerpts from their acclaimed album Kapture, a tribute to Ahmed Kathrada, a South African anti-apartheid activist who was imprisoned with Nelson Mandela for 26 years.

But — clash, clash — at 3pm in WPAC Theatre I have the chance to make up for missing Barney McAll & ASIO — featuring fellow-past winners of the National Jazz Awards, Julien Wilson (saxophone), Stephen Magnusson (guitar) and Sam Anning (bass), and an exciting young talent on drums, Dom Stitt — in a Melbourne International Jazz Festival outing at Merlyn Theatre, Malthouse.

Where to go? What to hear? Like any excellent menu, there are too many items from which to choose, all of them bound to be deeply satisfying. It’s a luxury to have such choices, but it’s also a pain in the …

At 4pm Origami, which is Adam Simmons on alto sax and bass clarinet, Howard Cairns on double bass and concertina, and Hugh Harvey on drums, will be definitely worth a visit (if only to see what colour socks Adam is wearing).

But I reckon there is only one option at 5pm, and that’s the finals of the National Jazz Awards in WPAC Theatre — a chance to hear the three finalists do battle with their saxophones. Gerry Koster will be in conversation with one of the festival musicians while the judges deliberate — worth staying to hear.

Time for some sustenance, then Andrea Keller presents Transients I with Sam Anning on double bass and Julien Wilson on bass clarinet and tenor sax at 8pm in WPAC Hall.

In WPAC Theatre at 8.30pm jazz vocalist and composer Chris McNulty — returning from 28 years in New York City and in 2013 winner of an Australian Bell Award for Best Vocal Jazz Album for The Song That Sings You Here — will preside over a chamber ensemble and jazz quintet for Eternal.

McNulty will be a huge drawcard, but I may slip out into WPAC Hall at 9pm to hear a bunch of other women — Sandy Evans, Angela Davis, Andrea Keller, Zoe Hauptmann and Sonja Horbelt — performing as the Melbourne Women’s International Jazz Festival Quintet.

From 10.30pm the undoubtedly crowded WPAC Theatre will hear Australia’s best-known jazz musician, consummate entertainer James Morrison along with sons William (guitar) and Harry (bass), plus Patrick Danao on drums.

In the Pinsent Hotel, Dixie Jack should still be firing until almost midnight, followed by the traditional jam session into the wee hours.

Will I still be firing? Hope so. You never know what might happen at a late-night jam session.

ROGER MITCHELL